Before 2025 in Nigeria (4) – Fola Daniel Adelesi

The Revolution in our Education

 

After four long years (with the intermittent interruptions of almighty ASUU) within the university walls, I wrote my final papers and went back to my home base in the country. As you can trust by now, my restless self will not just sit in one place until I lay my hands on something tangible to do so I kept going to a couple of organizations to present some proposals and at the same time trying to get an insider information from those organizations regarding recruitment as a new staff.

 

I primarily flaunted my projects, though they are my priority, so a number of the people, even and especially the big wigs, were in love with the laudable projects as they often say after my 5 minute persuasive speech tingling in the hears of the listeners because of the power of oratory in the evident in the slightly deep baritone voice and with nearly all words carefully pronounced. Did I just blow my trumpet? Oh! Please if I don’t it will rust because my lineage is not really the music freak kind. After playing intelligently around some of the organizations I found out that there was an auditioning to be conducted in one of the organizations just two days before the d-day.

 

I scaled through the first stage and was called upon to go for the next stage almost immediately. By the way, the person who did the interview at the first level said, “you guys are good for you to have qualified for this stage.” There were just five of us in the second stage and I was the only guy among four other ladies. When we finished I found out that one of the ladies had the working experience for the new job she came to be tested for. The three others already had a professional training from a designated school. I was the only one who was fresh from school yet I was on the same platform with the specially trained and experienced

 

Immediately after the interview my mind went back to the kind of stuffs they taught me in school. Instantly I asked, “did they teach me this in school?” No the lecturers did not but I had worked on myself. At that point I understood what some people meant when they said that the university systems were churning out unemployable graduates. Though I still stand on the fact that this is not absolutely true but I have come to see some vital issues.

 

Why did the university teach me so much of what nobody in the market place will ask from me? Why are people complaining about the quality of graduates when they have deliberately closed their eyes on the quality of some lecturers? I have seen the depth of decadence from no other place than the institution that is expected to teach decorum and instill values. What do you expect from a system that that operates by “you rob my back I rob your back?” (sexual demands from lecturers for good grades, sexual demand from students to students to impersonate during examination, students paid to impersonate, students paying others to write their final year long essays, lecturers showing up for classes two, three, four hours behind schedule and taking attendance in favour of the jobless students that waited for them, lecturers showing up in classes only three weeks to examination for the first time in the semester.)

 

All these and many more abound in our university system. I am not surprised because the lecturer is a product of the system and the students are the products of the lecturers. As much as it is important to note that not all lecturers are like this, we still would say that what the university has to offer through students can only compete favourably with the quality of lecturers in there. We all know the problems so what’s the way out?

 

Our first step to achieving the desired educational system is not to keep throwing out one minister for education or one vice-chancellor or principal but to check-mate mediocrity. Let’s throw them out if they need to be thrown out but like I said in the series I called “from personality to principles,” we need to begin a check on how things are done more importantly than who does those things.

 

I think we should not waste the lives of students teaching them what they do not need because the real educational system helps a child to discover his or her strength and focuses on that for the rest of the educational process.

 

Let’s have more technical colleges to churn out students that are practically relevant to the needs of the society because the society wants to pay for service and products, not raw information.

 

Our syllabuses should expand to accommodate sound leadership training because a lot of people have poor leadership mid set and still think that leadership is position. They also demand respect from those whose positions are supposedly inferior to theirs and they easily forget that old age is not automatic leadership.

 

There must be a power check – too many people are power drunk in the system and their greed increases when they realize that their tenures would expire and someone else has to come in. At this time they struggle to build loyalty so that they can still topple the administration of the incumbent.

 

When we check greed and avarice the lecturers have better lots so they do not need to transfer aggression to innocent students who usually become defensive in the process.

 

Our examination system is not going to help the kind of graduates we project for 2025 so we must adjust it to be more practical. The population is not an excuse not to prepare results or teach effectively. We have an idea of how many students are supposed to run practical classes then start in good time so as to finish at the expected time.

 

There is little or no test for the communication skills of our students and the truth is that effective communication is the weapon to fight against stagnation at some points in your life. If people know they can rise faster in life through communication, they will place a priority on communicating effectively.

 

Our educational system still ignorantly prides itself in the patronage of prospective students instead of the quality of students we produce. Once again, I am greatly looking forward to 2025 and we must put in all for such a time as this.

 

Fola Daniel Adelesi  tok2daniel@yahoo.com   +234 703 790 7851   +234 805 247 2448

 

Motivational Speaking, Proposal Development, Event Management …

 

About the author Fola Daniel Adelesi

Fola Daniel Adelesi is a professional public speaker who also trains other speakers. He's an highly engaging training facilitator and he holds his large audience spell bound when speaking at gatherings. He's an author, business consultant and highly skilled master of ceremony with excellent poise and diction. He was on the Debaters TV reality show season 1, he presented 'You Can' on Radio Continental in 2011 and he did motivational segments on Galaxy TV from Dec 2008 to August 2009. Fola Daniel has authored 3 books including Writing Business Proposals. He currently talks about Social Media on Info.com - An ICT Show on Lagos Television. Fola Daniel trained as a communications professional, works as a business consultant and was also trained at Lagos Business School in collaboration with Google as a Digital Business Manager. He presides over the following businesses: 1. Edible Pen Ventures ~ a total event package company. 2. Edible Pen Media & Publishing ~ For regular and new media businesses plus professional book publishing. 3. Edible Pen Training & Development ~ Management trainings and consulting for organisations and individuals.

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